Bas Bosschert, an IT guy from the Netherlands, has spent years working with Linux and Unix and today that experience has revealed a dark secret about the recently bought WhatsApp application. Bas has told us that one of the permissions WhatsApp requires to run is the ability to access and write to the external SD card of our phones, why is this not good? The external SD card in most of our phones is probably the most insecure part of the phone. So what WhatsApp does is backup all of your messages to your external SD card, convenient yes but very insecure.

WhatsApp essentially storing all of your messages on your external SD card means that any other application on your phone that has access to that SD card (a lot of them do) will be able to read those messages. All it takes is one malicious app that requires a permission to let it access your external SD card, which isn’t really a suspicious permission these days, to go through all of your sent messages and do God knows what with them. Oh and by the way the genius’ over on the WhatsApp team made the encrypting for their incoming and outgoing messages through the app the same which makes your messages even more insecure because now a hacker only needs to find out one of these to have access to both sets of messages.

What we recommend doing for the moment is cutting back on using WhatsApp for your messaging if at all necessary while the guys over at WhatsApp get their heads back on straight and fix this security flaw.

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Nicholas Terry

Nicholas Terry

(Author) - I am currently attending college to receive my degree in Computer Science with a pipe dream to someday work at Google. I love everything about android and smartphones and always love learning more about them or anything else tech wise. I also love developing Android apps and learning new types of code in my spare time. My current devices I use are my LG Optimus G and Nexus 7, Pebble watch is still on the way.
Nicholas Terry